Archive for February, 2008

caducity

Another entry in the lexicon.

ca·du·ci·ty /kəˈdusɪti, -ˈdyu-/

noun
1. the infirmity or weakness of old age; senility.
2. frailty; transitoriness: the caducity of life.

[Origin: 1760-1770; < F caducité, equiv. to caduc caducous + –ité -ity]

Source: Dictionary.com.

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sequacious

One more definition following on sequaciously from the previous one.

se·qua·cious /sɪˈkweɪʃəs/

adjective
1. following with smooth or logical regularity.
2. Archaic. following, imitating, or serving another person, esp. unreasoningly.

[Origin: 1630-40; < L sequāci– (s. of sequāx) following (akin to sequī to follow) + -ous]

-Related forms
se·qua·cious·ly, adverb
se·quac·i·ty /sɪˈkwæsɪti/,
se·qua·cious·ness, noun

Source: Dictionary.com.

fuliginous

The word I have noted down is actually ‘fuligin’. I can’t find any definitions of that exactly, but here is the denotation of ‘fuliginous’. And I can’t remember the context I read the word in, so I can only assume that this is relevant.

Main Entry: fu·lig·i·nous
Pronunciation: fyu̇-ˈli-jə-nəs
Function: adjective
Etymology: Late Latin fuliginosus, from Latin fuligin-, fuligo soot; akin to Lithuanian dūlis cloud, vapor, and probably to Latin fumus smoke – more at fume
Date: 1621

1 a: sooty b: obscure, murky
2: having a dark or dusky color
fu·lig·i·nous·ly adverb

Source: Merriam-Webster.com.

stillatory

More recondite lexemes.

Stil”la*to*ry, n.; pl. -ries. [From Still, for distill. Cf. Still, n., and Distillatory, a.] 1. An alembic; a vessel for distillation. [R.] –Bacon.

2. A laboratory; a place or room in which distillation is performed. [R.] –Dr. H. More. –Sir H. Wotton.

Source: Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary quoted on Dictionary.com.

assoil

This word appears in Fatal Revenant in the form ‘unassoiled’.

SYLLABICATION: as·soil

PRONUNCIATION: ə-soil

TRANSITIVE VERB: Inflected forms: as·soiled, as·soil·ing, as·soils
Archaic 1. To absolve; pardon. 2. To atone for.

ETYMOLOGY: Middle English assoilen, from Old French assoldre, assoil-, from Latin absolvere, to set free : ab-, away; see ab-1 + solvere, to loosen; see leu- in Appendix I.

OTHER FORMS: as·soilment -NOUN

Source: Bartelby.com.

charlock

One more Stephen R Donaldsonism.

char·lock /ˈtʃɑrlək/

noun
a wild mustard, Brassica kaber, having lobed, ovate leaves and clusters of small, yellow flowers, often troublesome as a weed in grainfields.

[Origin: bef. 1000; ME cherlok, OE cerlic < ?]

Source: Dictionary.com.

deflagrate

Back to obscure words, then.

def·la·grate /ˈdɛfləˌgreɪt/

verb (used with object), verb (used without object), –grat·ed, –grat·ing.
to burn, esp. suddenly and violently.

[Origin: 1720-30; < L déflagrātus (ptp. of déflagrāre to burn down), equiv. to – de- + flagr(āre) to burn + –ātus -ate1]

Related forms
def·la·gra·ble, adjective
def·la·gra·bil·i·ty, noun
def·la·gra·tion, noun

Source: Dictionary.com.