Archive for July, 2010

apodictic

ap·o·dic·tic /ˌæpəˈdɪktɪk/

–adjective
1. incontestable because of having been demonstrated or proved to be demonstrable.
2. Logic. (of a proposition) necessarily true or logically certain.

Also, ap·o·deic·tic  /ˌæpəˈdaɪktɪk/ Show Spelled, ap·o·dic·ti·cal.

Origin:
1645–55; < L apodīcticus < Gk apodeiktikós proving fully. See apo-, deictic

—Related forms
ap·o·dic·ti·cal·ly, ap·o·deic·ti·cal·ly, adverb

Source: Dictionary.com.

The fact is, I am dogmatic. I do have unwavering faith in a set of claims. I may affect suspicion of them, but FAPP, I use them as apodictic truths.

Source: Three Pound Brain.

Creativity is mistakes

“Creativity is mistakes” is the motto of ceramicist Grayson Perry. These words feature in the artist’s recent programme on Radio 4, Grayson Perry on Creativity and Imagination. It’s interesting stuff (if also somewhat blindingly obvious) and features interviews with a range of creative types, including Terry Pratchett. The piece begins with a list of myths, misconceptions about creativity:

Myth number one: The Eureka moment.

Myth number two: Anyone can do it.

Myth number three: Drugs are good for you.

Myth number four: Creative people are a bit mad.

Myth number five: Britain’s got talent.

CAVE people

CAVE People (an initialism for Citizens Against Virtually Everything) is a pejorative acronym for citizen activists who regularly oppose any changes within a community. The phenomenon is linked to the so-called NIMBY (Not In My Back Yard) phenomenon in which residents oppose a development as being inappropriate for their local area.

While the NIMBY phenomenon is typically related to development issues, CAVE people, as the name implies, oppose virtually everything. This may manifest itself in opposition to changes in public policy questions as varied as tax levies, sewer rates, public transportation routes, parking regulations and municipal mergers or annexations. “CAVE People” often express their views by attending community meetings, writing letters to the local newspaper, or calling in to talk radio shows.

Source: Wikipedia.

BANANA

I heard Adam Shaw refer to this NIMBY-term on today’s Today – and getting what it stands for wrong.

BANANA is an acronym for Build Absolutely Nothing Anywhere Near Anything (or Anyone). The term is most often used to criticize the ongoing opposition of certain Advocacy groups to land development. The apparent opposition of some activists to every instance of proposed development suggests that they seek a complete absence of new growth. The term is commonly used within the context of planning in the United Kingdom. The Sunderland City Council lists the term on their online dictionary of jargon.

Source: Wikipedia.

gouache

gouache /gwɑʃ, guˈɑʃ; Fr. gwaʃ/

–noun, plural gouach·es  /ˈgwɑʃɪz, guˈɑʃɪz; Fr. ˈgwaʃ/
1. a technique of painting with opaque watercolors prepared with gum.
2. an opaque color used in painting a gouache.
3. a work painted using gouache.

Origin:
1880–85; < F < It guazzo place where there is water ≪ L aquātiō, deriv. of aqua water

—Can be confused: gauche, gouache.

Source: Dictionary.com.

While he was still at school … he painted hundreds of gouache pictures and was famous among his school friends for his caricatures of teachers.

Source: Immortality by Milan Kundera.

charterhouse

Char·ter·house /ˈtʃɑrtərˌhaʊs/

–noun, plural -hous·es  /-ˌhaʊzɪz/
1. a Carthusian monastery.
2. the hospital and charitable institution founded in London, in 1611, on the site of a Carthusian monastery.
3. the public school into which this hospital was converted.
4. the modern heir of this school, now located in Surrey.

Origin:
1400–50; late ME < AF chartrouse (taken as charter + house), after Chatrousse, village in Dauphiné near which the order was founded; see Carthusian, whence the first r of the AF word

Source: Dictionary.com.

Agnes recalled a sentence from Stendahl’s novel: “Il se retira à la chartreuse de Parme.” Fabrice left; he retired to the charterhouse of Parma. No charterhouse is mentioned anywhere else in the novel, and yet that single sentence on the last page is so important that Stendahl used it for the title; because the real goal of all Fabrice’s adventures was the charterhouse, a place secluded from people and the world.

Source: Immortality by Milan Kundera.

epigone

ep·i·gone /ˈɛpɪˌgoʊn/

–noun
an undistinguished imitator, follower, or successor of an important writer, painter, etc.

Also, ep·i·gon  /ˈɛpɪˌgɒn/

Origin:
1860–65; < L epigonus < Gk epígonos (one) born afterward, equiv. to epi– epi- + –gonos, akin to gígnesthai to be born

—Related forms
ep·i·gon·ic /ˌɛpɪˈgɒnɪk/, adjective
e·pig·o·nism /ɪˈpɪgəˌnɪzəm, ɛˈpɪg-, ˈɛpəˌgoʊnɪzɪm, -ˌgɒnɪz-/, noun

Source: Dictionary.com.

Epigones are always more radical than their inspirers. For example, I am reading a very thorough French biography of Beethoven published in the 1960s. There the author speaks directly of Goethe’s “cowardice,” his “servility,” his “senile fear of everything new in literature and aesthetics,” etc., etc. Bettina, on the other hand, is endowed with “clairvoyance and prophetic ability, which almost give her the stature of a genius.”

Source: Immortality by Milan Kundera.