Posts tagged ‘quotations’

consistory

con·sis·to·ry /kənˈsɪstəri/
–noun, plural -ries.

1. any of various ecclesiastical councils or tribunals.
2. the place where such a council or tribunal meets.
3. the meeting of any such body.
4. Roman Catholic Church. a solemn assembly of the whole body of cardinals, summoned and presided over by the pope.
5. Anglican Church. a diocesan court for dealing with ecclesiastical and spiritual questions, held in the cathedral church and presided over by the bishop, the bishop’s chancellor, or the commissary.
6. (in certain Reformed churches) the governing board of a local church or congregation.
7. any assembly or council.
8. Obsolete. a council chamber.

Origin:
1275–1325; ME consistorie < AF < LL consistōrium meeting place, equiv. to L consist ( ere ) ( see consist) + -( t ) ōrium -tory2

—Related forms
con·sis·to·ri·al  /ˌkɒnsɪˈstɔriəl, -ˈstoʊr-/, con·sis·to·ri·an, adjective
non·con·sis·to·ri·al, adjective

Source: Dictionary.com.

all the animals of Satan’s bestiary, assembled in a consistory and set as guard and crown of the throne that faced them, singing its glory in their defeat, fauns, beings of double sex, brutes with six-fingered hands, sirens, hippocentaurs, gorgons, harpies, incubi, dragopods, minotaurs, lynxes, pards, chimeras, cynophales who darted fire from their nostrils, crocodiles, polycaudate, hairy serpents, salamanders, horned vipers, tortoises, snakes, two-headed creatures whose backs were armed with teeth, hyenas, otters, crows, hydrophora with sawtooth horns, frogs, gryphons, monkeys, dog-heads, leucrota, manticores, vultures, paranders, weasels, dragons, hoopoes, owls, basilisks, hypnales, presters, spectafici, scorpions, saurians, whales, scitales, amphisbenae, iaculi, dipsases, green lizards, pilot fish, octopi, morays, and sea turtles.

Source: The Name of the Rose by Umberto Eco.

gouache

gouache /gwɑʃ, guˈɑʃ; Fr. gwaʃ/

–noun, plural gouach·es  /ˈgwɑʃɪz, guˈɑʃɪz; Fr. ˈgwaʃ/
1. a technique of painting with opaque watercolors prepared with gum.
2. an opaque color used in painting a gouache.
3. a work painted using gouache.

Origin:
1880–85; < F < It guazzo place where there is water ≪ L aquātiō, deriv. of aqua water

—Can be confused: gauche, gouache.

Source: Dictionary.com.

While he was still at school … he painted hundreds of gouache pictures and was famous among his school friends for his caricatures of teachers.

Source: Immortality by Milan Kundera.

charterhouse

Char·ter·house /ˈtʃɑrtərˌhaʊs/

–noun, plural -hous·es  /-ˌhaʊzɪz/
1. a Carthusian monastery.
2. the hospital and charitable institution founded in London, in 1611, on the site of a Carthusian monastery.
3. the public school into which this hospital was converted.
4. the modern heir of this school, now located in Surrey.

Origin:
1400–50; late ME < AF chartrouse (taken as charter + house), after Chatrousse, village in Dauphiné near which the order was founded; see Carthusian, whence the first r of the AF word

Source: Dictionary.com.

Agnes recalled a sentence from Stendahl’s novel: “Il se retira à la chartreuse de Parme.” Fabrice left; he retired to the charterhouse of Parma. No charterhouse is mentioned anywhere else in the novel, and yet that single sentence on the last page is so important that Stendahl used it for the title; because the real goal of all Fabrice’s adventures was the charterhouse, a place secluded from people and the world.

Source: Immortality by Milan Kundera.

epigone

ep·i·gone /ˈɛpɪˌgoʊn/

–noun
an undistinguished imitator, follower, or successor of an important writer, painter, etc.

Also, ep·i·gon  /ˈɛpɪˌgɒn/

Origin:
1860–65; < L epigonus < Gk epígonos (one) born afterward, equiv. to epi– epi- + –gonos, akin to gígnesthai to be born

—Related forms
ep·i·gon·ic /ˌɛpɪˈgɒnɪk/, adjective
e·pig·o·nism /ɪˈpɪgəˌnɪzəm, ɛˈpɪg-, ˈɛpəˌgoʊnɪzɪm, -ˌgɒnɪz-/, noun

Source: Dictionary.com.

Epigones are always more radical than their inspirers. For example, I am reading a very thorough French biography of Beethoven published in the 1960s. There the author speaks directly of Goethe’s “cowardice,” his “servility,” his “senile fear of everything new in literature and aesthetics,” etc., etc. Bettina, on the other hand, is endowed with “clairvoyance and prophetic ability, which almost give her the stature of a genius.”

Source: Immortality by Milan Kundera.